Transporting bike (first time) - Yamaha FZ-09 Forum
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post #1 of 11 Old 07-01-2015, 07:58 PM Thread Starter
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Transporting bike (first time)

This is the first time I am hauling my motorcycle in the bed of my truck for a 4 hour drive up north. I need advice from the forum who can help me possibly make this a successful trip.

I went and picked up 4 cam style tie downs that are 2 inches wide and 8 feet long. I will not be able to close the bed of the truck more then likely as I think the bike is too long and I don't have a bed extender.

Are these tie downs ok?
Do I have enough?
Where do you recommend anchoring them around the bike to secure it?
I don't have a wheel chalk? Is that going to be an issue? Is there a way to rig up a home made one so I don't have to spend $100 bucks for one.

Do I put the bike in gear? I have read that I should leave it in neutral? Do I zip tie the brake?

I have two ramps that are 8 feet long and arched. I plan on backing the truck into the gutter and dropping the bed down to lower the angle for the ramps.

Total noob on this so any advice is greatly appreciated. Tips, etc…?

Many thanks!
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post #2 of 11 Old 07-02-2015, 03:43 AM
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If this is your first time loading into your truck. Get some back up. I'm sure you can do it yourself given a few moments to think it through. But as insurance it's good to have some help. While doing it you might find a good method that works for you. Your tie downs should be fine though I can't see how your hooking to the bed. But to the bike it's just one hook on one side of the handle bars and one on the other side. Pull straight down tight into the mid stroke of the forks, and you'll see the bike will be pretty well planted. You won't need four except for your piece of mind.
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post #3 of 11 Old 07-02-2015, 10:00 AM Thread Starter
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Thank you good sir! That is exactly what I was hoping to hear in that my ties were ok and quantity ok. I am solo on this endeavor so I have no back up, but will take my time. I hear that stopping and checking the load frequently is important as well?

Last question, I hear that going from elevation 2k up to 9k can lead to blown fork seals? Is this true or any science to back up the claim I read on ADV?
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post #4 of 11 Old 07-02-2015, 02:31 PM
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Elevation change like that makes sense. If it were me I would at some point in the elevation climb readjust the straps to change the pressure in the forks. But that's just a guess as I never have occasion to go above 5000. Hopefully someone with experience with those conditions can pipe in before you set sail. My brother is a long haul driver, and going over the Rockies. He's had sealed bottles pop on him.
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post #5 of 11 Old 07-02-2015, 05:44 PM
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Cycle Cynch -- best way to tie down the handlebars, and you don't need to get them tight. Someone recommended this to me a few years ago, and they were right. It doesn't distort the grips, very secure.

I gave away my Canyon Dancers and got these... the guy who got the Canyon Dancers had his RSV4 Factory on it's side in the trailer a while later, now he uses the Cycle Cynch.

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post #6 of 11 Old 07-03-2015, 08:21 AM
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Yup, cycle cynch is the way to go.

Don't leave the kickstand down. A buddy of mine did that on his Ducati and cracked the case from all the bouncing since that's where it's mounted. FZ is different but still, it would mess something up probably.

So many bikes get messed up from actually driving them up so take your time on that. Make sure the oil pan doesn't drag on the ramp or tailgate when getting up. You have arched ramps so that shouldn't be a problem. Make sure that they don't budge from the tailgate either and slip off...ugly.....

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post #7 of 11 Old 07-03-2015, 02:24 PM
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A few comments...I use three ramps...a center high capacity ramp, and two other ramps...all with the same profile. Using an aluminum tube underneath, I tie them all together with three simple bolts and wing nuts. I can thus straddle the bike and I have stable footing on each side...and I use the engine to pull the bike up. I don't ride it...but I am over it. It's very important that you fully secure the ramps to the truck so that they don't kick out. I use two straps for that, and I make sure that I coil the strap at least twice so there is no slippage within the ratchet. I also have another set of tailgate cables, but that's just me.

If you can find them, get about 6 to 8 soft ties. I sit the bike straight in...handlebar straight. I use soft ties and straps on the handle bars going out to the front sides of the truck. Then I go with straps from the top area of the front shocks to the front floor of the truck. Bike is not in gear...kickstand up. I use multiple straps going from the center of the bike (usually around the frame between front and rear pegs) to strong tie points in the truck bed. Don't be afraid to over do it...better to have more than a failure. Also, always make sure that you coil enough strap within the ratchet, or you could get slippage. I also use non-ratchet straps as a "quick way" to stablize the bike, but not for final transport. Be sure to tie-up the loose strap ends.

And try to minimize the climb...if there is a hill, have the truck pointed downward so that the bike and ramps are on the high side. Makes a big difference.

If you look at the first few photos of my bike, you can see how I have it tied in the truck bed.
http://www.fz09.org/forum/6-fz-09-ge...ike-today.html
The orange straps on the front shocks go down to bed connections...the material going out to the truck sides is just the excess strap material.

You don't need wheel chocks, but I do run straps from the wheel spokes on both sides for the purpose of not allowing the tires (and the bike) to slip toward one side. You could take some 1X2 wood and make a simple bed frame for the front tire, making the frame the width of the truck bed and setting the front tire into the wood cradle. I just use two straps.

Last edited by Spacecoast; 07-03-2015 at 02:48 PM.
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post #8 of 11 Old 07-07-2015, 08:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pbanks5 View Post

Last question, I hear that going from elevation 2k up to 9k can lead to blown fork seals? Is this true or any science to back up the claim I read on ADV?
That is laughable.The increase in pressure differential (inside the fork/outside) due to altitude change is nothing compared to the pressure increase caused by normal suspension movement.

Even if you rode the bike to the moon,the pressure differential in the vacuum of space would only be an average of 14 psi (1 bar).
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post #9 of 11 Old 07-13-2015, 12:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Spacecoast View Post

If you look at the first few photos of my bike, you can see how I have it tied in the truck bed.
Got my Bike Today
Thanks for link advice
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post #10 of 11 Old 09-10-2015, 07:34 AM
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There were some good tips above. I always use Ancra ratchet straps on the front, if not all four points. I wrap the tails around the ratchet and zip tie them in place. A piece of plywood with 1x3s should make a stable wheel chock or you could make it long enough for both wheels.

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